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religion has the most force. the courts are like the worst place in order to try to get a religious belief codified or encoded into law. because the way in which the supreme court. >> you have to have a secular purpose for the law. when religious right was on the offense, what it did was to use a ballot initiative. everyone goes into the voting booth and votes their religious convictions. you can't second guess that. now that those statutes have become to be struck down by the courts, giving us secular reasons. now that they're playing defense, what the religious right is doing is saying, let's rely on the free exercise clause in order to allow individuals to sort these claims in court. in some ways, arizona was the easiest case, she showed no evidence of religious discrimination against businesses. land of legal, gay rights organization told me today they had received almost 500 complaints over the past four years about lgbt discrimination in arizona. >> which is legal. >> it starts to feel like, you hurt my fist when i hit your face argument. but i think as we move to other states, that
the case in arizona, businesses to use religion as a defense in a private lawsuit. so to give you an example of how that might play out, you know, let's say you live in a state where it's illegal to fire someone because they're gay. now, if one of these bills passes, that company could turn around and say, oh, hey, i think homosexuality is a sin, therefore i'm going to fire you and i don't need to abide by this law. so, you know, that lawsuit provision is a big deal. >> i know in some of the cases, in some of the states where they've been considering this, the lawsuit provision works in such a way not only can you not sue somebody for discriminating against you, but if you do, you have to pay their legal fees as well as your own so it's almost a punishment for even complaining about being discriminated against. it's fascinating stuff and fast-moves story. dana lieblson, reporter for "mother jones." nice to see you. >> thanks for having any. >>> the federal prosecutor's investigation of the george washington bridge scandal in chris christie's new jersey has taken a turn today. we'v
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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